Quia amore langueo. Θησαυρος της εκκλησιας (Treasures of the Church): Quia Amore Langueo (in modern English) 2019-02-08

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3. Quia Amore Langueo by Anonymous. Nicholson & Lee, eds. 1917. The Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse

quia amore langueo

These gloves were given me when I her sought; They be not white, but red and wan; Embroidered with blood my spouse them brought. In weal and in woe I am aye to support: Mine own wife, go not me fro! Make ye no noise, but let her sleep. I brought her to worship, and she brought me to scorn; I did her worship, and she did me villainy. Thy meed is marked, when thou art mort, Quia amore langueo. Some wait their prey to make her flee; I run tofore to chastise her foe. Should I always feede thee With children meat? Look unto mine handes, man! Here's a pretty astonishing medieval lyric. I may not unkindly thee appeal Quia amore langueo.

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Θησαυρος της εκκλησιας (Treasures of the Church): Quia Amore Langueo (in modern English)

quia amore langueo

Should I always feede thee With children meat? Hir bed is maade, hir bolstir is blis; Hir chaumbir is chosen, is ther non moo. I may of unkindness thee appeal, Quia amore langueo. What mede is aye to live in comfort? In a valey of this restles mynde, I soughte in mounteyne and in mede, Trustynge a trewelove for to fynde. To love that loveth is no mastery, her hate made never my love her foe ask than no more questions why, but Quia amore langueo. The stanzas that focus on Christ's sufferings for men make the poem apt for the time of Lent, as we focus even more on Christ's Passion. ’ Vpon thys mownt I fand a tree; vndir thys tree a man sittyng; from hede to fote wowndyd was he, hys hert blode I saw bledyng; A semely man to be a kyng, A graciose face to loke vnto.

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Francis Pott

quia amore langueo

Marvel not, man, though I sit still. In tribulation I reign more rife Often times than in disport, In weal and in woe I am aye to support; Mine owne wife, — go not me fro! Fair love, let us go dine: Thy sustenance is in my crippe, lo! What would'st thou, spouse, that I should do? Thou weepest, thou gladdest, I sit thee by: Yet would thou once, love, look unto me! Rotem's work, forged by the iron discipline of the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, can only be regarded as formidable. Wax not weary, mine own wife! See, love hath shod me wonder strait: Buckled my feet, as was her will, With sharpe nails well thou may'st wait! In the vale of restless mind I sought in mountain and in mead, Trusting a true love for to find. I crowned her with bliss and she me with thorn; I led her to chamber and she me to die; I brought her to worship and she me to scorn; I did her reverence and she me villany. Make ye no noise, but let her sleep. Foundest thou ever love so leal? He was a man fit to be a king, with a gracious face to look at.


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Francis Pott

quia amore langueo

What shall I do now with my spouse But abide her of my gentleness, Till that she look out of her house Of fleshly affection? What wilt thou, soul, that I shall do? What shall I do now with my spouse? I shall thee clothe in a new array, Thy meat shall be milk, honey and wine. I saved her from beating, and she hath me bet; I clothed her in grace and heavenly light; This bloody shirt she hath on me set; For longing of love yet would I not let; Sweete strokes are these: lo! These hands for her so friendly fought Quia amore langueo. If thou mourn for anything, I shall comfort thee. See, love hath shod me wonder strait: Buckled my feet, as was her will, With sharp nails well thou may'st wait! For in tribulation I run more rife Oftentimes than in disport; In wealth, in woe, ever I support, Then, dear soul, go never me fro! In tribulation I reign more rife Ofter times than in disport. What shall I do now with my spouse But abide her of my gentleness, Till that she look out of her house Of fleshly affection? Those who have ever heard Profeti della Quinta can attest to their exquisite way of making music. If thou be foul, I shall thee make clean; If thou be sick, I shall thee heal; If thou mourn ought, I shall thee mene; Why wilt thou not, fair love, with me deal? Here she may wash away anything that befouls her; here is shelter for all her sorrow.

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Quia Amore Langueo

quia amore langueo

My sister, man's soul, I loved thus: because we would not in any way be parted, I left my glorious kingdom, I prepared for her a precious palace. What shall I do now with my spouse But abide her of my gentleness, Till that she look out of her house Of fleshly affection? My babe Y wolde not were in disese; I may not heere my dere child wepe; With my pap Y schal hir kepe. Tarry thou not, my fair spouse mine, Quia amore langueo. Tarry thou not, my fair spouse mine, Quia amore langueo. What shall I do now with my spouse But abide her of my gentleness, Till that she look out of her house Of fleshly affection? The refrain 'quia amore langueo', which means 'because I languish for love', comes from the Song of Songs.

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Poem: Quia Amore Langueo by Mary G. Segar

quia amore langueo

My fair love and my spouse bright, I saved her from betting, and she hath me bet; I clothed her in grace and heavenly light, this bloody surcoat she hath on me set, for longing love I will not let; sweet strokes be these, lo; I hath loved ever as I promised, Quia amore langueo. I will abide till she be ready, I will her sue if she say nay; If she be retchless I will be greedy, If she be dangerous I will her pray; If she weep, then bide I ne may: Mine arms ben spread to clip her me to. This is her chamber, here shall she rest, That she and I may sleep in peace. No wonder though I tend her to: This hole in my side had never been so deep, But quia amore langueo. Its sustained fifteen minute drama, in a post-Howells harmonic language, is tinged with a very personal and often ecstatic lyricism. I saved her from beating, and she has beaten me. Heere schal sche reste, That sche and Y may slepe in fere.

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Quia amore langueo, (Book, 1937) [wingle.jp]

quia amore langueo

I don't think that's proper spanish. Schulde I alwey fede thee With children mete? Thou weepest, thou rejoicest, I sit beside thee; but wouldest thou once, love, look to me? In my love was never deceit; All my members I have opened her to; My body I made her heart's bait Quia amore langueo. Look out on me at the window of kindeness Quia amore langueo. These gloves were given me when I her sought; They be not white, but red and wan, Embroidered with blood, my spouse them bought; They will not off, I leave them nought, I woo her with them wherever she go; These hands full friendly for her fought, Quia amore langueo. They will not off; I loose hem nought; I woo her with hem wherever she go.


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Quia Amore Langueo

quia amore langueo

Look out on me at the window of kindeness Quia amore langueo. I asked him how he had paining, he said, ' Quia amore langueo. It's quite long; but the last two verses are the best! Thy meed is marked when thou art mort, Quia amore langueo. To love that loveth is no maistry; Her hate made never my love her foe: Ask me then no question why-- Quia amore langueo. I purveyed her a palace full precious; She fled, I followed, I loved her so That I suffered this pain piteous Quia amore langueo. In my side I have made her nest, look, in me how wide a wound is here! These gloves were given me when I her sought; They be not white, but red and wan; Embroidered with blood my spouse them brought. I will prove thy love with adversite Quia amore langueo.

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Quia amore langueo : & Richard de Castre's Prayer to Jesus, from the Lambeth MS. (Book, 1915) [wingle.jp]

quia amore langueo

Alana has put music to it. Por usually implies some kind of exchange. I will prove thy love with adversite Quia amore langueo. Marvel not, man, though I sit still, my love hath shod me wonder straight; she buckled my feet as was her will with sharp nails, well though mayest heed! I will test your love with adversity Quia amore langueo. In my side I have made her nest; Look in, how weet a wound is here! In my love was never deceit, For all my members I have opened her to; My body I made her heartes bait, Quia amore langueo.

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A Clerk of Oxford: In a valley of restless mind: Quia amore langueo

quia amore langueo

My fair love and my spouse bright! Tarry thou not, my fair spouse mine, Quia amore langueo. This is her chamber; here she shall rest, and she and I shall sleep in company. Foundest thou ever love so leal? They are not white, but red and pale, embroidered with blood. My fair love and my spouse bright! I may not unkindly appeal to thee Quia amore langueo. Upon an hill then took I heed; A voice I heard and near I yede In great dolour complaining tho: See, dear soul, how my sides bleed Quia amore langueo. Make ye no noise, but lete hir slepe. What wilt thou, soul, that I shall do? Thou maiste waitenails; In my love was nevere desaite.

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